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Fast food chains demand rail-mounted robot kitchen assistant

Miso Robotics Robot on a Rail

Architects of a robotic burger-flipping kitchen assistant have re-engineered the product so that it can be installed under a standard kitchen hood following feedback from fast food chains that have tested the equipment. 

Miso Robotics described the “breakthrough” prototype of its Robot on a Rail (ROAR) as a “zero-footprint, cost efficient kitchen robot with expanded capabilities”.

Taking into account market feedback from leading quick service restaurant chains, engineers have turned the problem statement on its head by moving ‘Flippy’ – its original robotic kitchen assistant – to an upside-down rail.

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The newest generation of Flippy is intended to be installed under a standard kitchen hood and allows it to move along a line of kitchen equipment, tucked away out of the path of busy chefs.

Miso Robotics anticipates ROAR will be commercially available by the end of 2020 and said updates will ultimately allow it to create a zero-footprint product, lowering the cost of automated kitchen equipment and offering true end-to-end automated cooking services.

“It was incredible to see the efficiency with which the team adapted Flippy to a rail. In my mind, that validated the software platform approach we took in designing Flippy’s brain,” said Dr. Ryan Sinnet, CTO of Miso Robotics.

While the next generation of the product has been taking shape, the team has continued to make breakthroughs in the artificial intelligence software that powers Flippy.

This has resulted in software that has greatly expanded the food categories that Flippy can cook over a dozen types of fried food including chicken wings, onion rings, popcorn shrimp, sweet potato waffle fries, corn dogs and more.

Miso Robotics is looking to build on the momentum it gained in 2019 when it secured contracts for Flippy at a number of major sites in North America.

In the process, the equipment was responsible for serving up more than 15,000 burgers and 31,000 lbs of chicken tenders and tots.

Miso is also confident of tapping into the ‘dark kitchen’ market as QSRs seek to meet on-demand orders quickly and address high industry staffing turnover, while ensuring consistent food, optimised for freshness and taste.

Tags : automationkitchen robotMiso Robotics
Andrew Seymour

The author Andrew Seymour

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